Social Media and Sexual Assault

Cute schoolgirl child playing and surfing online late at night. Child addicted to internet games and social media can´t sleep hooked on laptop. Digital technology in childhood and internet addiction.

Social media has been around since the beginning of this millennium. It was  designed and created with the intention of allowing users to complete tasks  such as “sharing, learning, interacting, and marketing” (Inquire Web). People  were able to connect with those they admired most, share personal moments  with their friends, and interact easily with people across the world, all with the  press of a button. How can something so powerful, so intricate be responsible for  the destroyed mental health of teenagers across America?  

The answer is in the question itself. Social media possesses infinite powers, and its  intricacy is beyond what we have ever thought possible. (ever wonder why the Terms and Conditions no-one bothers to read are so long?). Social media users  have the ability to filter and thoroughly edit their lives—so much so, that what goes onto their profiles and stories does not resemble their personalities even by  the slightest margin. For many of today’s teenagers, social media is so integrated into our daily routines, we can’t go a day without it. If we do, it feels  like we’re missing a part of ourselves. When we see view our feeds or “for you pages,” the perfectly edited lives of those around us make us question ourselves.  We think, why can’t I look like that? Why can’t I own cars or technology like that?  

Questions like this plague our minds as we use social media. That said, social  media is a beautiful creation: some people have created and sustained their  careers on social media, others have profited exponentially from marketing their  businesses through sponsored advertisements on social media platforms like  Instagram or Facebook. Some businesses thrive off celebrity testimonials on the  aforementioned platforms. We should learn to use social media with a healthy  mentality, one that doesn’t allow for questioning of our blessings and privileges,  and instead allows for us to interact with those that mean the most to us. This  isn’t going to be an easy journey, but I believe in our generation.  

Source: http://thoughtfullearning.com/inquireHSbook/pg271

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